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Lets put a stop to child sexual exploitation

Merseyside Police and Sefton Council are showing their support as part of National Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) Awareness Day.

 

The purpose of the day is to raise awareness of CSE by gathering information, working alongside our partner agencies and talking to children and vulnerable people about standing up and speaking out against CSE.

 

On Tuesday, March 19, officers and staff from the local policing teams in Sefton are carrying out a day of action at St Michael’s Secondary School in Crosby. Here they’ll be accompanied by charity ‘Catch 22’ where they’ll deliver a series of CSE workshops where children can learn about supporting their friends, ways of reporting abuse and inappropriate relationships as well as speaking out against abuse.

 

Cllr John Joseph Kelly, Cabinet Member for Children, Schools and Safeguarding said; “The Council are committed to preventing young people from being sexually abused. We are working with the Merseyside Police and partner agencies to help tackle this problem.

 

“It is everyone’s responsibility to protect children from this devastating crime and so it’s important to understand what child exploitation is, be aware of the warning signs, and have the confidence to discuss any concerns with the Council’s safeguarding team.”

 

Detective Superintendent Sue Coombs from the Protecting Vulnerable People Unit said: “Sexual exploitation exists in lots of different forms and it is not always obvious to the victim when it first starts happening. It’s a dreadful crime which can have a devastating impact on the lives of victims and their families, which is exactly why having something like National CSE Day to highlight the issue is so important.

 

“We all have a duty of care to young people living, working and visiting Merseyside and we should all continue to try and help in any way we can to put a stop to the sexual exploitation of children.

 

“We must talk openly and encourage parents, grandparents, teachers, health professionals, social services and any other adults alike to take some time to better educate themselves about CSE and its devastating consequences. That way, each of us can spot the signs, protect young people and reduce the number of offences being committed.”

20 Mar 2019

Author
Charlene Smith
Sefton Council
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